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Regional air masses and valley winds affect the aerosols in mountainous area in India

Regional air masses and valley winds affect the aerosols in mountainous area in India

The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and Indian partner TERI measured driving factors of aerosol properties over the foothills of Central Himalayas. Research shows that transported air from the plains affects the aerosols in the area.

The aim of the research was to characterize the physical, optical and chemical properties of aerosols, analyze the trends and background levels in Mukteshwar, India.

The 8.5 years of continuous measurements showed that Mukteshwar site is primarily under the influence of transported air from the plains below. The aerosol variables clearly present highest concentration during the afternoon hours in the pre- and post-monsoon season, partly high during winter and minimum in the monsoon season.

Horizontal and vertical exchange processes and valley wind influence to the mixing height are the predominant reasons for the poor performance of climate models in the area. This highlights the importance of long-term direct measurements at multiple points to understand aerosol behavior in mountainous areas.

Research was conducted at a research station of FMI and TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute) in Mukteshwar. This dataset represents the longest surface in situ aerosol observations from India which comprises physical and optical properties.

Further information:

Rakesh K Hooda, Finnish Meteorological Institute, tel. +358 50 4014544, rakesh.hooda@fmi.fi

Hooda, R. K., Kivekäs, N., O'Connor, E. J., Collaud Coen, M., Pietikäinen, J.‐P., Vakkari, V., Backman, J., Asmi, E., Komppula, M., Korhonen, H., Hyvärinen, A.-P., & Lihavainen, H. (2018). Driving factors of aerosol properties over the foothills of central Himalayas based on 8.5 years continuous measurements. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 123, 13,421–13,442. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JD029744


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