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New information about physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia

New information about physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia

This is the first time to clearly derive the comprehensive physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia.  Aerosol measurements station was established at a rural background area in the Western Saudi Arabia to study the aerosol properties. This study gives overview of the aerosol physical properties over the measurement period from November 2012 to February 2015.  As expected aerosol mass  concentration was dominated by desert dust in coarse mode  . Especially from February to June the coarse mode concentrations were high because of dust storm season. National annual air quality limits were exceeded even in background area. Total number concentration was dominated by frequent new particle formation and particle growth events. These former particles grew to sizes where they can affect both climate and air quality. These events were observed clearly in more than half of the analysed days. The new particle formation mechanism might be related to strong regional sulphur dioxide emissions.

More information:

Head of group Heikki Lihavainen,tel.  +358 29 539 5492, heikki.lihavainen (a) fmi.fi

H. Lihavainen, M. A. Alghamdi, A.-P. Hyvärinen, T.Hussein, V. Aaltonen, A. S. Abdelmaksoud, H. Al-Jeelani, M Almazroui, F. M. Almehmadi, F. M. Al Zawad, J. Hakala, M. Khoder, K. Neitola,  T. Petäjä, I. I. Shabbaj and K. Hämeri, Aerosols Physical properties at Hada Al Sham, Western Saudi Arabia, Atmospheric Environment, Volume 135, Pages 109–117, 2016

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231016302588


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